HGTC Engineering Students Place Third in ASCE Carolinas Competition | Horry Georgetown Technical College

HGTC Engineering Students Place Third in ASCE Carolinas Competition

Horry Georgetown Technical College

HGTC Engineering Students Place Third in ASCE Carolinas Competition

HGTC recognized over senior colleges

(CONWAY) Apr. 6, 2017 -- Students from Horry Georgetown Technical College’s (HGTC) civil engineering technology program took home a trophy this weekend in the American Society of Civil Engineers’ Carolinas conference at the University of North Carolina, Charlotte. The HGTC team placed third in the surveying event and was the only two-year technical college represented at the competition. 

“We are very proud of our civil engineering students for not just competing against four-year engineering schools, but for bringing home a trophy,” said HGTC President Dr. Marilyn Fore. “This accomplishment is a testament to the caliber of students and faculty we have at Horry Georgetown Technical College.”

The HGTC team also competed in the steel bridge and freshmore flagpole scavenger hunt challenges. Clemson University, The Citadel, Duke University, North Carolina State, UNC Charlotte and Georgia Tech were among the other schools competing.

HGTC’s civil engineering technology program is an Associate in Science degree, and credits transfer to four-year colleges.

See the Snapchat video here

The students and faculty who competed for HGTC were:

Surveying Team

  • Alex Todd
  • Heaven Hinkle
  • Jane-Madison Sellers
  • Matthew Singleton

Steel Bridge Team

  • Tucker Hight
  • Hobie Hobart
  • Nate Salvo
  • Levi Woodard
  • Matthew Singleton
  • Oluwalolope Alo

Flag Challenge

  • Diego Lopez
  • Heaven Hinkle
  • Austin Davis
  • Joshua Watford
  • Bessie Adkins
  • Connor Toole
  • Bernard Jones

Mead-Paper

  • Jane-Madison Sellers
  • Jessica Munoz

Faculty Representatives

  • Babatunde Alo
  • Richard Bartholomy
  • Joseph Meyer

HGTC offers college transfer and skilled associate degree programs in more than 80 fields of study. Nearly all programs feature internships that lead to jobs. Ninety-five percent of students either transfer to earn advanced degrees or start careers in their respective fields of study.

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